Life can be tough. We live in a broken world where sin has made its ugly mark. At times, we wonder what God is up to. We can easily get focused on the problems that we face and forget about the awesome power of the God whom we serve. In the 32nd chapter of the book of Jeremiah, we find the Old Testament prophet by that name facing a great crisis. He professes a strong faith, but questions God’s intentions in the midst of his trials. God then uses Jeremiah’s own words to renew the prophet’s confidence in the LORD to prevail in all situations.

Then the word of the Lord came to Jeremiah, saying, 27 “Behold, I am the Lord, the God of all flesh. Is there anything too hard for Me? (Jeremiah 32:26-27NKJV)

To understand God’s arresting question to Jeremiah, let’s move through chapter 32 toward our text. First, we find Jeremiah and the city of Jerusalem in:

A Desperate Situation (32:2)
We know from the dates mentioned regarding the kings that this event took place in late 588 or early 587 B.C., less than a year before the complete fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians. After centuries of Judah’s meandering in and out of the will of God, the nation had finally become so wicked that God sentenced them to be exiled to Babylon. Only the poorest of the land would be left as caretakers of the fields. Jerusalem had been under siege for two years. The sword, famine, and plague were bringing the city to collapse. The enemy already controlled the rest of the nation. In the midst of Judah’s discipline, Jeremiah had been given a very difficult assignment by the Lord. He was to tell both the king and the people not to resist the besieging Babylonians. They were to surrender and become captives rather than resist and die. This word from God through Jeremiah was vehemently rejected. The people were appalled. This would be akin to a prophet, today, telling Israel not to resist the Palestinians, Saudis, or Iranians, but to voluntarily lay down their arms and surrender to their enemies. The wrath of the king and the people was against the prophet. He had been imprisoned in the courtyard of the king’s own complex. Jeremiah was a prisoner in a city that was on the verge of a humiliating defeat. He was a prophet to a people who were awaiting exile. Judah’s King, Zedekiah, accused Jeremiah of treason, demanding an answer as to why the prophet would not encourage the people rather pronounce doom. The answer was two-fold. What Jeremiah was preaching was true, and God had commanded him to proclaim this message. To describe to the king God’s broader plan, Jeremiah told Zedekiah the story of his receiving from God:

 

An Unusual Commandment (32:6-7)

The word of the Lord came to me saying, ‘Behold, Hanamel the son of Shallum your uncle will come to you, saying, “Buy my field which is in Anathoth, for the right of redemption is yours to buy it.”’

God’s provided a method in the law of Moses by which families would keep the lands that He had assigned to them. Under this law, when a person desired to sell property due to need or lack of heirs, he would request that others within the clan buy it, beginning with their nearest kin. Accordingly, the Lord revealed to Jeremiah that his cousin, Hanamel, would come to him while he was imprisoned to request the he purchase a parcel of family property in Anathoth. This city was Jeremiah’s hometown. It was located about three miles north of Jerusalem. As soon as this word from the Lord was given to Jeremiah, Hanamel arrived to offer the land. Hanamel’s offer confirmed to the prophet that the word had come from God. He quickly carried out the transaction. However, he was not sure why the Lord chose to insist that he purchase property even as the nation and its capital were about to fall. That led Jeremiah to experience:

A Moment of Uncertainty (32:17-25)
Jeremiah offers a prayer, actually, an awesome prayer that begins with an affirmation of God’s power, “Ah, Lord God! Behold, You have made the heavens and the earth by Your great power and outstretched arm. There is nothing too hard for You.” (32:17). But as the prayer closes, the prophet expresses his amazement, even doubt as to the meaning of God’s actions. That prompts the Lord to make His own affirmation and to ask Jeremiah a startling question based upon the prophet’s own words:

An All Important Question (32:26-27)

Then the word of the Lord came to Jeremiah. Saying, “Behold, I am the Lord, the God of all flesh. Is there anything too hard for me?” The Lord continues by revealing that He will indeed allow Jerusalem to be completely destroyed and the people to be carried into exile. However, He will ultimately bring the people back to Judah with purified hearts and prepared to serve Him. Jeremiah’s purchase of the property is a prophetic picture of the life that will be lived again one day by the people of God in the land given to them. They will buy and sell land as before. He will both discipline and purify His people and bring to pass their restoration.

Our purpose, today, is to focus upon the statement that the Lord made to Jeremiah and its implication for our lives. The issue come to the forefront in the question that the Lord poses:

“Is there anything too hard for me?”

Life can be tough. We live in a broken world where sin has made its ugly mark. At times, we wonder what God is up to. We can easily get focused on the problems that we face and forget about the awesome power of the God whom we serve. In the 32nd chapter of the book of Jeremiah, we find the Old Testament prophet by that name facing a great crisis. He professes a strong faith, but questions God’s intentions in the midst of his trials. God then uses Jeremiah’s own words to renew the prophet’s confidence in the LORD to prevail in all situations.

We can become pessimistic about the situations of life. We may often need to ask ourselves these questions:

IS IT TOO HARD FOR GOD TO:

-Save a sinner?

“For the Son of Man has come to seek and to save that which was lost.” (Luke 19:10)

-Renew a backslider?

Create in me a clean heart, O God,
And renew a steadfast spirit within me.
11 Do not cast me away from Your presence,
And do not take Your Holy Spirit from me.
(Psalm 51:10-11)

-Heal the broken hearted?

He heals the brokenhearted and binds up their wounds. (Psalm 147:3).

-Revive a church?

 And I also say to you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build My church, and the gates of Hades shall not prevail against it. (Matthew 16:18)

-Send a Spiritual Awakening to America?

Then the word of the Lord came to Jeremiah, saying, 27 “Behold, I am the Lord, the God of all flesh. Is there anything too hard for Me? (Jeremiah 32:26-27)